model for the understanding of school as a socialising agent. --.
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model for the understanding of school as a socialising agent. --.

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Published by s.n. in [S.l .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Socialization.,
  • Education, Secondary -- Great Britain.,
  • Educational sociology -- Great Britain.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesSchool as a socialising agent
ContributionsSwift, Betty
The Physical Object
Pagination37 leaves :
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19103186M

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Keywords: gender, socialization, youth, generations, family, stereotypes, gender roles. INTRODUCTION This paper1 is concerned with understanding different dimensions of gender socialization, which vary in their impact on the young and which are essential to build up a gender identity. The aim of the article is to analyse how the genderFile Size: 64KB. The next important agent of childhood socialization is the school. Of course, the official purpose of school is to transfer subject knowledge and teach life skills, such as following directions. One social agency created to enhance the processes of socialization and education is the school. Socialization is the process of creating a social self, learning one's culture and learning the rules and expectations of the culture. The school is. school, a combination of recollections of their own school experiences and their attitudes, val-ues, and beliefs about school, influence parent-ing behaviors with children making the transi-tion to school. In this article, we focus primarily on parental contributions to academic socializa-tion, but the importance of understanding trans-.

  1. THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL AS A SOCIALIZING AGENT 2. Socialization is the process of creating a social self, learning one’s culture and learning the rules and expectations of the culture. 3. The school is an artificial institution set up for the . The school is the first large-scale organization of which the child becomes a member. The school is a minpature reflecting what goes on in the wider society. One way of appreciating the school’s potential for socialization lies in the simple reckoning of the amount of time s the youngsters spend in school and in activities related to the school. difference between the family as an agent of socialization and the school is in the nature of institutionalized, formal ruling of the latter. It follows the fact that the school is an essential step towards the acquisition and integration skills to living with others in a Size: KB. School is the first place, as children that we begin to interact with others in a public environment. At school we meet new friends, learn our society?s norms, as well as learn good moral values. It is also a very influential socialization agent in our life. A norm is what is generally accepted among society but not necessarily a law.

In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of ization encompasses both learning and teaching and is thus "the means by which social and cultural continuity are attained".: 5 Socialization is strongly connected to developmental psychology. Humans need social experiences to learn their culture and to survive. ADVERTISEMENTS: This article provides information about the meaning, features, types, stages and importance of socialisation! Every society is faced with the necessity of making a responsible member out of each child born into it. The child must learn the expectations of the society so that his behaviour can be relied upon. He must acquire the [ ]. ways in which children learn the culture of their society role model family as an agent of socialization children learn the social role expected of them by looking at role models within the family unit. e.g. their parent of sibling. social control manipulation. the socialization. School and classroom rituals, led by teachers serving as role models and leaders, regularly reinforce what society expects from children. Sociologists describe this aspect of schools as the hidden curriculum, the informal teaching done by schools.. For example, in the United States, schools have built a sense of competition into the way grades are awarded and the way teachers evaluate students.